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What You Need to Know: Early Intervention Babies have many new skills to learn – lifting their heads, sitting up and saying their first words! Parents, grandparents, other family members and early care and education professionals sometimes have concerns about a child’s development. To learn more about early intervention services check out Document
What Your Baby's Smile Can Tell You About Her/His Development Infants’ earliest grins are a primitive impulse but become a communication tool; know the types of baby smiles Starting nearly from birth, infants' ethereal grins provide a window into their social and emotional development, researchers say. And the responses those enchanting and goofy expressions elicit can help program babies' brains for a lifetime of social interactions. Document
When Biting Happens: Strategies for Staff, Children, and Parents This info module explores the reasons that children bite and strategies for prevention and intervention. Info Module
When Concerns Arise: What are Red Flags for Developmental Concerns? (Part Two) In part two of this series on developmental concerns, we will define what a red flag means as we observe a child’s development. Is it one behavior or a cluster of behaviors? In addition, we will discuss the impact culture may have on developmental milestones as we consider red flags for developmental concerns. Our inclusion consultant, Priscilla Weigel, will share examples from her work with young children. Podcast
When Concerns Arise: Why Developmental Milestones are Important (Part One) In this series on developmental concerns, we begin by looking at typical developmental milestones as guideposts for understanding how children develop their social, emotional, language, physical, and cognitive skills. Why is this important to the early childhood practitioner? What do we need to know in order to provide developmentally appropriate care? Podcast
Which Babies are at Higher Risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome? Babies in Native American and Alaska Native families are at higher risk of sudden unexplained infant death, despite years of effort to reduce the toll. African-American families also face higher risk. Document
Why Becoming a Good Parent Begins in Infancy Social skill acquisition is profoundly important in attaining personal satisfaction in relationships and achieving success in many spheres of life, including parenting. Professionals, who are uniquely positioned to observe and help shape relationship skills, have a special responsibility to be aware of those educational opportunities and of the context in which relationship education of parents, children and youth is occurring.  Document
Why Do Babies Like Boxes Best? Why do babies like gift boxes best? The answer lies in their development. While the toys and presents can be cute and interesting to adults, babies can't do much with them and they do not offer the endless opportunities that the box and the paper do for exploring with all the senses. Children at one year of age are in the stage of development Piaget (a psychologist who studied child development) called sensor motor play when babies actively explore toys and other objects first with their eyes, then with their hands and mouths. Website
Why Hurry? Respecting Development and Learning There is a lot of pressure on parents and teachers to have children ready for school. Families are inundated with a barrage of information from websites, television commercials, and well-meaning friends about buying or doing certain things so that their children will be successful. Teachers are being pushed to make sure they are instructing children, even babies, in the skills they need to be "ready" for the next step, whether it is preschool or kindergarten or reading. However, David Elkind (1987) states, no authority in the field of child psychology, pediatrics, or child psychiatry advocates the formal instruction, in any domain, of infants and young children. In fact, the weight of solid professional opinion opposes it and advocates providing young children with a rich and stimulating environment that is, at the same time, warm, loving, and supportive of the child's own learning priorities and pacing. It is within this supportive, non-pressured environment that infants and young children acquire a solid sense of security, positive self-esteem, and a long-term enthusiasm for learning. Document
Why Interaction Must Come Before Language Every family member is eager to hear their child use words and start putting sentences together. But did you know that the road to successful communication begins long before children start using words? Website