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Resource Name Description Resource Type
Access to Pre-K Education Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act This policy brief is an overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and discusses policies that can help to increase the number of homeless children in pre-k programs. Document
Accessing Disability Services in Minnesota Guide A guide to selected services for individuals with disabilities and their families. Document
Active Supervision: Free Time Caregivers are responsible for keeping children safe. Active supervision requires constant vigilance, focused attention, and intentional observation of children at all times. This tip sheet offers strategies essential for successful active supervision and creating safe environments. Tipsheet
Active Supervision: Outside Outdoor play is active therefore children will need more supervision than they do indoors. Keep children safe outside by following the strategies in this tip sheet.  Tipsheet
ADA Questions and Answers for Child Care Questions & Answers about the Americans with Disabilities Act and Child Care. Document
Adaptability and Mood: How to Help Children with Change Some children have difficulty when it comes to adjusting to attempts to change or influence what they are doing. Change is often hard for many of us when we are doing something we really enjoy! When you also factor in a child’s natural mood, you can find yourself in a struggle with a young child. In this podcast, Cindy and Priscilla will talk about ideas to help children who may struggle with adapting to changes in their world. Podcast
ADHD in Young Children: Use Recommended Treatment First Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry recommend behavior therapy over medication as first-line treatment for young children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently analyzed healthcare claims data for young children insured by Medicaid between 2008 and 2011 and young children insured through employer-sponsored insurance between 2008 and 2014, finding that approximately 75% of young children with ADHD received medicine as treatment. Only about 50% of young children with ADHD in Medicaid and 40% with employer-sponsored insurance received psychological services, which may have included behavior therapy. Website
Administration for Children and Families The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is responsible for federal programs that promote the economic and social well-being of families, children, individuals, and communities. ACF programs aim to achieve the following: families and individuals empowered to increase their own economic independence and productivity; strong, healthy, supportive communities that have a positive impact on the quality of life and the development of children; partnerships with individuals, front-line service providers, communities, American Indian tribes, Native communities, states, and Congress that enable solutions which transcend traditional agency boundaries; services planned, reformed, and integrated to improve needed access; and a strong commitment to working with people with developmental disabilities, refugees, and migrants to address their needs, strengths, and abilities. Website
Administration on Disabilities (AoD) The Administration on Disabilities works with states, communities, and partners in the disability networks to increase the independence, productivity, and community integration of individuals with disabilities. AoD includes the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) and the Independent Living Administration (ILA). AIDD is dedicated to ensuring that people with disabilities have opportunities to make their own choices, contribute to society, have supports to live independently, and live free of abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Website
After the Fire: The Teachable Moment Created by Prevention 1st for classroom teachers, preschools, and day care providers of children affected by a fire. The program provides free materials that help teachers and caregivers deal with the emotional trauma of children and move beyond the incident to teach life-saving fire safety and fire prevention. The program includes: 3 teaching modules with age-appropriate activities for processing the fire event, fire survival skills, and fire prevention skills; Reading list of books in English and Spanish that facilitate discussion of a fire incident, fire safety or fire prevention; Household safety checklists, and at-home activities students can take home. Website