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Resource Name Description Resource Type
Use Visual Strategies for Autism Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and lots of other students with behavior or communication challenges tend to be visual learners. They understand what they see better than what they hear. Therefore, they benefit significantly from the use of Visual Strategies. Deciding when and how to use pictures and other visual supports is the key. This website gives valuable information for speech pathologists, educators, parents, and therapists on how and when to use visual strategies. Website
Using Visual Supports for Young Children As adults, we use visual signs and symbols on a daily basis to help us safely and successfully navigate the world around us. While visual supports are important to adults, they are just as significant to children. One of the important goals of an early care and education professional is to provide an environment that is supportive in which each child, regardless of ability, has an opportunity to grow and learn with his or her peers. In this self-study course participants will explore the use of visual supports for young children. Knowledge and Competency Framework Area - II.A: Creating Positive Learning Experiences  CDA Content Area - II: Steps to advance children’s physical and intellectual development   This course is accessible from a mobile device. For optimal performance, viewing from a computer or tablet is highly recommended.  For ten clock hours on your Learning Record, please register and pay online at Develop. Then, complete a 500 word reflection paper and submit this document with your reflectionPlease note: You have access to this document as view only. To enable editing, download the document. Click "file" then "download as" in the upper left-hand corner of this screen. This will give you the option to open the document as a Word doc on your own computer. Then, you can complete the information and email it to: credit@inclusivechildcare.org. *Disregard any directions regarding a final quiz. The only learning assessment needed is the reflection paper. Course
Why Should You Create a Sensory Bin for your Child? Gina Gibson, Fraser Sensory Inclusion Specialist and Fraser Pediatric Therapy Staff writes, "creating a sensory bin for your kids is one way to encourage sensory play. Sensory bins can be particularly beneficial for children struggling with language, children with developmental disabilities or those with food or sensory sensitivities." Website
Yale Developmental Disabilities Clinic The Autism Program at Yale is an interdisciplinary group of clinicians and scholars dedicated to providing comprehensive clinical services to children with autism spectrum disorders and their families. This is also one of the leading research centers in the world and recently recognized as a National Institutes of Health AUTISM CENTER OF EXCELLENCE. Our program involves infants, toddlers, pre-school, and school-age children, as well as young adults (18-21 years) with autism and related disorders and integrates highly experienced professionals from the fields of clinical psychology, neuropsychology and neuroimaging, child psychiatry, speech-language pathology, social work, genetics and the biological sciences, as well as psychopharmacology and psychiatric nursing. Our clinical and research activities are located in the Child Study Center at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Website
Young Children with Autism--What Does the Label Really Mean: Part One In the first of this series of podcasts, Cindy and Priscilla interview Pat Pulice, M.A., L.P., Vice President of Integrated Health Care at Fraser in Minneapolis, MN, on what the major characteristics of autism can look like in a young child, how early we might identify a child, and what the identification process includes for young children who may have development red flags for autism. As with all children, the important attitude is seeing who the whole child is and what can support their special needs as they grow and develop. Podcast