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Resource Name Description Resource Type
A Better Start: Why Classroom Diversity Matters in Early Education The results of this study show racial/ethnic and economic disparities in preschool enrollment and in the quality of preschool that children experience. Among families who do enroll in preschool, the study finds that most children attend classrooms that are homogenous in family income, and often in race/ethnicity as well. The result is a segregated system in which low-income and minority children often attend low-quality and non-diverse early-childhood programs. The authors discuss researching findings on why the socioeconomic and racial/ethnic composition of early childhood classrooms is important and provide a number of suggestions for steps that can be taken to increase diversity. Document
A Glimpse into the World of Selective Mutism This info module provides an overview and strategies for supporting children with selective mutism. Info Module
A Guide for Parents: Questions to Ask When Seeking Child Care for Children with Special Needs A tip sheet with guiding questions for family members to use when seeking an early care and education program for a child with special needs. Tipsheet
A Guide to Developmental Milestones, Red Flags, Early Intervention and Inclusion This video, produced for the Somali community, addresses developmental milestones for children and red flags for developmental delays as well as covering the topics of early identification and early intervention. This video also contains interviews with Somali parents of children who have special needs and an interview with a Somali physician. Website
A Guide to Executive Function Executive function and self-regulation skills are like an air traffic control system in the brain—they help us manage information, make decisions, and plan ahead. We need these skills at every stage of life, and while no one is born with them, we are all born with the potential to develop them. But, how do we do that? The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University created this Guide to Executive Function to walk you through everything you need to know about these skills and how to develop and practice them throughout life. Document
Access to Pre-K Education Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act This policy brief is an overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and discusses policies that can help to increase the number of homeless children in pre-k programs. Document
ADA Fact Sheet This federal civil rights law protects from discrimination people of all ages with disabilities. Document
ADA Questions and Answers for Child Care Questions & Answers about the Americans with Disabilities Act and Child Care. Document
ADHD: Seeing the Disability Behind the Behavior This course examines the myths and facts of AD/HD and successful strategies for inclusion of children with AD/HD in child care settings. For ten clock hours on your Learning Record, please register and pay online at Develop. Then, complete a 500 word reflection paper and submit this document with your reflectionPlease note: You have access to this document as view only. To enable editing, download the document. Click "file" then "download as" in the upper left-hand corner of this screen. This will give you the option to open the document as a Word doc on your own computer. Then, you can complete the information and email it to: credit@inclusivechildcare.org. *Disregard any directions regarding a final quiz. The only learning assessment needed is the reflection paper. Course
Administration for Children and Families The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is responsible for federal programs that promote the economic and social well-being of families, children, individuals, and communities. ACF programs aim to achieve the following: families and individuals empowered to increase their own economic independence and productivity; strong, healthy, supportive communities that have a positive impact on the quality of life and the development of children; partnerships with individuals, front-line service providers, communities, American Indian tribes, Native communities, states, and Congress that enable solutions which transcend traditional agency boundaries; services planned, reformed, and integrated to improve needed access; and a strong commitment to working with people with developmental disabilities, refugees, and migrants to address their needs, strengths, and abilities. Website