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Resource Name Description Resource Type
Understanding Special Needs Rates of the Child Care Assistance Program The Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) Special Needs Rate is available for children with special needs in Minnesota who receive CCAP and meet designated criteria. This tip sheet provides a description of the Child Care Assistance Program's Special Needs Rate and the process to request. Tipsheet
Understanding the Effects of Maltreatment on Brain Development This June 2015 brief from the Child Welfare Information Gateway provides basic information about brain development and the effects of abuse and neglect on that development. It is meant to help professionals understand the emotional, mental, and behavioral impact of early abuse and neglect on children who come to the attention of the child welfare system. Document
Use Visual Strategies for Autism Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and lots of other students with behavior or communication challenges tend to be visual learners. They understand what they see better than what they hear. Therefore, they benefit significantly from the use of Visual Strategies. Deciding when and how to use pictures and other visual supports is the key. This website gives valuable information for speech pathologists, educators, parents, and therapists on how and when to use visual strategies. Website
Using Books to Teach Your Child about Natural Disasters Natural disasters can be scary topics for young children, but reading together about these events is a great and less-frightening way to discuss them. It also allows for great conversations about what to do if a natural disaster occurs. Website
Washburn Center for Children The Washburn Center highlights its mission to help families and children at risk, suffering from mental health issues related to chemical dependencies and independent. Publications, articles, feedback from families, insurance info, and lots of relevant links and location information. Five Minneapolis locations and lots of volunteer opportunities. Website
What to Do (and Not Do) When Children Are Anxious When children are chronically anxious, even the most well-meaning parents can fall into a negative cycle and, not wanting a child to suffer, actually exacerbate the youngster’s anxiety. It happens when parents, anticipating a child’s fears, try to protect her from them. Here are pointers from the Child Mind Institute for helping children escape the cycle of anxiety. Document
What to Expect and When to Seek Help: Tools to Promote Social and Emotional Development About the Tools: Throughout the tools, a strong emphasis is placed on strengths as well as concerns. The information under "What to Expect" not only offers a guide to healthy development and parenting, but provides information that parents can find reassuring about their child's behavior and their own parenting. The tools provide an opportunity to identify concerns at an early stage. The information under "When to Seek Help" includes concerns that might be addressed with additional information, as well as concerns that signal the need for further assessments and services. Website
When Things Aren't Perfect: Caring for Yourself and Your Children The human body is designed to handle some stress. Some stress, like the first day of kindergarten or working on a big school project, can actually be positive and help kids develop resilience. Resilience means being able to adapt and cope with stress in a way that helps you get better at handling stressful situations in the future. Document
Why Hurry? Respecting Development and Learning There is a lot of pressure on parents and teachers to have children ready for school. Families are inundated with a barrage of information from websites, television commercials, and well-meaning friends about buying or doing certain things so that their children will be successful. Teachers are being pushed to make sure they are instructing children, even babies, in the skills they need to be "ready" for the next step, whether it is preschool or kindergarten or reading. However, David Elkind (1987) states, no authority in the field of child psychology, pediatrics, or child psychiatry advocates the formal instruction, in any domain, of infants and young children. In fact, the weight of solid professional opinion opposes it and advocates providing young children with a rich and stimulating environment that is, at the same time, warm, loving, and supportive of the child's own learning priorities and pacing. It is within this supportive, non-pressured environment that infants and young children acquire a solid sense of security, positive self-esteem, and a long-term enthusiasm for learning. Document
Why Interaction Must Come Before Language Every family member is eager to hear their child use words and start putting sentences together. But did you know that the road to successful communication begins long before children start using words? Website